Art Museum at the University of Toronto

The Art Museum at the University of Toronto is an interdisciplinary arts hub that offers new encounters with diverse artistic and cultural perspectives. Comprising two galleries located just a few steps apart, the Art Museum brings together the Justina M. Barnicke Gallery at Hart House and the University of Toronto Art Centre at University College and is one of the largest gallery spaces for visual art exhibitions and programming in Toronto. It is a vital cultural resource and destination for the general public and the arts and academic communities worldwide.

While we develop the new Art Museum website please visit us at the Justina M. Barnicke Gallery or University of Toronto Art Centre for exhibitions, programs, collections and general information.


Justina M. Barnicke Gallery
7 Hart House Circle
Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H3
416.978.8398

University of Toronto Art Centre
15 King’s College Circle
Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H7
416.978.1838

artmuseum@utoronto.ca

Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Sunday
Monday

12:00–5:00 PM
12:00–8:00 PM
12:00–5:00 PM
12:00–5:00 PM
12:00-5:00 PM
Closed
Closed


Current Exhibition

Counterpoints: Photography Through the Lens of Toronto Collections

May 6 – July 30, 2016
Justina M. Barnicke Gallery and University of Toronto Art Centre

Curated by Jessica Bradley
Presented in partnership with Scotiabank CONTACT Photography Festival

The Art Museum is proud to present Counterpoints, a major exhibition that reveals the remarkable breadth and depth of interest in photography in this city. The exhibition has evolved through the generosity of passionately committed collectors who granted the loan of their works, allowing them to be seen by the public - many for the first time in Toronto. Highlighting a broad spectrum of private collections, Counterpoints proposes an experience of looking at photography that is ultimately heterogeneous and non-linear. Spanning nearly two centuries, the exhibition comprises 19th century singular images captured on metal and glass plates, through to artists’ works that acknowledge photography’s endlessly reproducible, ubiquitous presence in a vast and ephemeral digital world.

Read more …

Image Credit: Stephen Waddell, Lakeside, 2011. Archival inkjet print, 44 x 55 in. Courtesy of the artist and Monte Clark, Vancouver. Collection of Ann and Harry Malcolmson.